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 Sustainable livelihoods & resource use
 
Introduction




The high dependence of rural people on wetland resources and the huge potential that sustainable management of these resources offers for livelihood improvement and national development is such that conservation of biodiversity must also address sustainable livelihoods.

Click on the navigation options in the left hand column to find out more information about the following topics.

Community based resource management
Communities throughout the Mekong basin possess a wealth of experience and knowledge in the management wetland resources. A wide variety of local management regimes have been established to manage access and use of wetland resources safeguarding the resources and their benefits.

Community based monitoring
By taking ownership of their research local people can build a local information base to help raise awareness of natural resources in the area and enable them to better deal with management of their natural resources.

Environmental economic valuation
The significant contributions that wetland resources make to local livelihood economies are often not recognised in larger scale river basin planning and policy. The MWBP directly addresses this through research and awareness raising activities, working with local and national stakeholders, and increasing understanding of wetland values.

Poverty & vulnerability
Some of the most significant threats to livelihoods come from environmental degradation and habitat loss.

Climate change
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Nutrition & health
Aquatic resources are essential sources of animal protein in rural diets. Very often these diets are deficient of protein sources, and any degradation of aquatic resource systems can be anticipated to have dramatic impacts on the nutritional and health status of rural people.

Access rights
The programme will focus on the livelihood security of Lower Mekong communities from the perspective of rights to aquatic resources – the “missing link” between poverty and resource degradation -- and demonstrate the links between the existence and quality of rights to aquatic resources and the economic role of resource rights in sustaining livelihoods.

Alternative livelihoods
Due to the website still being under development the content for this section will be uploaded in the near future.

Sustainable agriculture
Due to the website still being under development the content for this section will be uploaded in the near future.

Ecotourism
Due to the website still being under development the content for this section will be uploaded in the near future.